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ENC 1101 - Prof. Burns-Davies: Argument Research Paper

Students' Argumentative Research Paper Connected to Stereotypes and Discrimination

The content of this essay should be an argument on a subject raised in any of our selected readings and/or discussions since the second essay. These subjects include discrimination and ethnic, disability, gender and sexuality stereotypes. You are required to use research for this assignment.  You are to cite your sources (both within the essay and with a works cited page).

SUGGESTED TOPICS: • Oppose or defend one or several points raised by any of our selected authors/speakers since the second formal essay.  

Paper Requirements:

  • The paper should incorporate at least four (4) sources, and at least two (2) of the four should be from academic databases.
  • Follow MLA guidelines
  • Dictionaries and encyclopedias DO NOT count toward the research credit.
  • Wikipedia is a BANNED source.
  • Cite your sources (both within the essay and with a works cited page). Follow MLA guidelines.

SUGGESTED TOPICS:  OPpose or defend one or several points raised by any of our selected authors/speakers since the second formal essay. Explain reasons why you agree or disagree with any of their arguments.

  • Analyze Jane Elliott’s Blue Eye/ Brown Eye experiment to teach how institutionalized racism functions. Consider, for example, her use of the green collars, the number and placement of chairs, the posters on the classroom walls, the use or deprivation of food and beverages, etc. How do these props emphasize her points?
  • In The Angry Eye, Jane Elliott compares the students’ reactions to the loss of privilege to the five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance). What evidence do you see to support this (whether the material you use is from the video or other works involving Jane Elliott)? What might this tell us about the way racism (or discrimination in general) is embedded in our culture?
  • While the video we watched in class was made in 2001, consider the possible relevance of Jane Elliott’s exercise today. In the last year alone, what issues (personal observations or experiences, examples from popular culture, political statements or other events) have surfaced regarding race and racism in the United States? Do these issues warrant the use of Jane Elliott’s exercise?
  • Jane Elliott’s Blue Eye/Brown Eye experiment has been controversial since its inception. Does it deserve any of the criticism it has faced? Examine the virtues and flaws of the experiment to determine whether it has merit in combatting racism.
  • Considering Maysoon Zayid’s TED Talk, “I got 99 problems. . . palsy is just one,” analyze how depictions of disability impact the way we view people with disabilities. You might focus on one or two examples in particular—whether they are offensive or progressive.
  • Considering Nico Lang's "The Real Costs of a 'Marvel Body': How the Pressure to Look Like Thor and Captain America is Hurting Men," analyze how representations of manhood in pop culture and other methods of socialization impact the way men view themselves and their masculinity. In what ways are these representations progressive and/or harmful? Try focusing on one source in particular, such as professional athletes as role models; male action figures; prominent male characters from film, television, video games, etc.; figures in your personal life; etc.
  • Considering Caroline Heldman’s TED Talk, “The Sexy Lie,” analyze the impact of sexual objectification of women. Focus on a particular example—such as a film portrayal, a magazine cover, a Youtube commercial, a sitcom character, etc.—and offer a criticism or defense of that example.
  • The Pride on Screen podcast discusses LGBTQ+ portrayals in film and television and analyzes how those representations impact audiences’ attitudes. Offer your own analysis of a specific portrayal of an LGBTQ+ character from pop culture and examine whether it is an offensive or progressive depiction.
  • Analyze a character (from film, television, etc.) that presents a stereotypical depiction of another group.

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Student Research Appointment

For personal assistance from a librarian, please specify two days and times you are available to meet. Please allow 30-45 minutes for your appointment . We recommend scheduling 2 days in advance in order to accommodate your desired meeting time.

Below are links to the Writing Labs located on our North, South, and Central campuses. Students can receive assistance with their writing needs in a friendly atmosphere.

Central Campus Writing Lab (Building 17, Room 241)

North Campus Writing Lab (Building 62, Room 132)

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Printing from a Library Computer

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Printing from USB:

NOTE – Cannot print Excel documents from USB drive

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  • Touch USB.
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  • Review the cost of the print job. Touch Print to accept and begin printing.
  • Touch Done when you are finished

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Email your file to print@printme.com. You will receive an emailed reply with a unique Document ID (numbers are saved for 24 hours only) and a bar code you can scan at the printer.

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  • After download, the first page of the file is shown in preview. You can move forward through pages and zoom. Touch Next.
  • Choose print options, including number of copies, page range, and color options (if color MFP). Touch Next.
  • Review the cost of the print job. Touch Print to accept and begin printing.
  • Touch Done when you are finished.

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