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ENC 1101 - Prof. Hofman: Argument Paper

Suggested Topics- General

GENERAL SAMPLE TOPICS (Must be narrowed for the assignment!):
Education: Creativity in public schools (select a grade range --elem, middle, grade, high, or higher; choose a side to argue providing either: 1) the ways school/government restricts creativity or 2) the present options for creativity in public schools).
The Digital Era: The effects of digitalization on visual art (paintings, photographs, etc.)
Gender issues: Disparities between what is socially acceptable for men and what is socially acceptable for women 
Cutting down on fuel: Public and Alternative Transportation
• YOU MAY SELECT YOUR OWN TOPIC APART FROM THIS LIST.

ALL TOPICS MUST BE APPROVED BY PROFESSOR

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Assignment

Argumentative Research Paper

Purpose: Prove a viewpoint. The argument essay is a way to express your opinions using calculated evidence, clear details, and thorough research using books, articles, and databases.

The key to an argument is anticipating the opposing view and providing support that will refute their counter-arguments and strengthen your thesis. 

Keep in mind:

  • You will need 3 or more peer reviewed sources. 
  • The paper will be 5-10 pages.
  • Use MLA 7th edition format and citation style (ie. 12pt. Times New Roman font, double spaced, 1 inch page indentation).
  • DO NOT USE PERSONAL PRONOUNS.
  • Write to your audience (general, educated but not an expert on your topic).
  • 5 Ws and an H
  • Consider probing questions: What are the problems that are faced? How are the problems overcome? What are the motives of the sides involved? What is the purpose of the action being argued? What are the effects and who are the affected? Who is responsible? What groups or individuals are affected? Who benefits?
  • Remember to verify your sources, make certain they can pass the CRAAP test -  can you identify the Currency, Relevancy, Accuracy, Authority and Purpose of your resource? If not, consider finding a more reliable/authoritative source.
  • Explore: Similarities, Opposits, Contrasts, Relationships, Anthropomorphism, Personifications, and/or Patterns within your topic.

Make a claim, one that is disputed, in doubt or controversial. Do not state a fact. Provide evidence to support your claim using credible (library) resources. Sythesize your ideas, going beyond summar and fact, creating a new idea or argument for the topic you chose. 

Suggested Databases

Contact Information

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Judi Tidwell
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954-201-6489